Will Cockerell

Will Cockerell

The colossal importance of cricket first became clear to a 10-year-old Cockers in the glorious "Blackwash" summer of 1984 when at one of his father's weddings, the groom addressed the guests: "as you know this is the happiest day of my life.  At lunch the West Indies were 70-4, with Viv Richards out for one."  Although the course of that marriage did not run smooth, young Will was hooked at something that was clearly more vital than getting hitched.  

Since then, a dilettante life of top 40 finishes at the London marathon, a book on the marathon, spells at The Week magazine and a columnist for Athletics weekly, and even as a commentator on Eurosport's World Series of Backgammon; but cricket will forever remain his one true love (although he failed to mention this at his own wedding).

Recent articles by Will Cockerell

Less Rourke's drift, more Isandlwana? England capitulate on day two

Morning session. The first session was one of the most bonkers and barnstorming sequences of Test Match play you'll ever see – a superb advert for the finest format of the game. The swings in fortune, the drama and daredevilry were quite dazzling, none more so than Jimmy's astonishing figures of 4 for 4 in 3.2, quite simply Nobody Does It Better. After Philander failed to add to his overnight 54 with a soft spoon to Dawson, Maharaj was at least one too high up the batting order as Root dove for a super catch to send the confidence pumping through his already gung-ho veins. Chris Morris faffed around rather as his scratchy strike rate of 43 belied that of one of the world's great stroke-makers, and Morkel after driving Broad twice for four was out flashing.

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Memoirs of a Saffers Junkie

Has there been a more consistently absorbing Test Match rivalry over the past 40 years to match the struggles of England versus South Africa? Will Cockerell believes not, as he reminisces on some epic affairs since the end of apartheid. 1994 It's almost impossible to describe the euphoria of the opening days of the Lord's Test of 1994 and our renewed acquaintance with a fabled foe. The weather was perfect and it was nostalgic to see Cap'n Kepler, he of Ashes' '85 ilk, grind out an emotional ton on an evenly poised 1st day. After that, the mother of all shellackings, with England dire and Atherton getting his hands dirty; too dirty as it turned out. An wild and apoplectic Jon Agnew called for skipper's head, which many felt was "a bit much".

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