Nakul Pande

Nakul Pande

When he was but a lad, Nakul rolled up his possessions in a cloth bag, tied said bag to a stick and made his way to The Big City from The Frozen North, full of idealistic notions about education for education's sake. Five years and one abandoned Classics degree later, he got his piece of paper and ran into the safe, welcoming arms of the service industries. He has one shot and, predictably, bowls wrist-spin.

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Recent articles by Nakul Pande

Searching for a hero: Is Hardik Pandya the real new Kapil Dev?

The nostalgic Eighties hunt for a seaming all-rounder is not only an English obsession, as Nakul Pande explains. Top tier: the first Hardik Pandya was admired by millions. Tunbridge Wells, Saturday June 18,1983: India collapse to 9-4, and then 17-5, against Duncan Fletcher's completely unfancied Zimbabweans. India's charismatic mustachioed captain takes the game into his own hands, and smites the bowling to all parts of Kent to the tune of 175* off 138 balls to take India to a competitive and ultimately winning total.

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Before the Sprinkler: six hours of torture at the hands of Brad the Impaler

There must be somewhere more comfortable to watch an Ashes than a freezing student shithole above an Indian restaurant in Euston. But that fate befell Nakul Pande who shivers at the memory, one made worse by the interminable company of a grizzled Australian wicketkeeper – and a reminder that 2010-11 wasn't all plain sailing. It is often said that the English have no national myths to speak of – no Aeneid, no Mahabharata, no Washington and the cherry tree. Even King Arthur is a Norman import. The English, they say, have no myths.

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Rain 2, England 1, South Africa 0

Stumps, day 3: England second innings, 74/1, lead by 252 runs Tea: England second innings, 74/1, lead by 252 runs Nuff said. Oh, yes: Morne Morkel bowled Alastair Cook with the greatest ball no-one will remember.

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If you don't like Moeen Ali, you don't like cricket

Final report: England (458 & 233) beat South Africa (361 & 119) by 211 runs. Moeen Ali is only one bad spell or loose shot from people who are wrong to call for him to be dropped. But even they can only rise, along with all of Lord's and all here at GC Towers, to salute England's bearded wonder, who was deservedly named man of the match. The 87 runs in the first innings were compiled in classically beautiful, at times breathtaking fashion. But it was his 10-112, dismissing all of South Africa's frontline batsmen bar Duminy at least once, that not just underlined but writ large across the cloudless London sky his all-round value to this England team - he bowled with turn, bounce, accuracy, and subtle variation in pace, making him a joy to watch with ball in hand.

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